An inquiry into remote learning…

In Australia we have now begun planning for continuous remote learning, given the inevitability of school closure to limit the spread of COVID-19. I’m reminded of my very first blog post, more than ten years ago!

It is important to start by recognising how incredibly fortunate we are.

How many children around the world experience interruption to schooling due to disease, natural disaster or war? How many have access to an education at all? Of those that do, how many are lucky enough to have ready access to the resources that we do? Do we understand that in remote communities, this might be the way learning always looks? Do we appreciate the technology, books, materials, time, space and people to whom/which we have access? Do we acknowledge the collective wisdom and generosity of other teachers and schools with more experience than we have, readily sharing their ideas and expertise with us? We have so much to be grateful for.

The initial response of our teachers, ranging from excitement to panic, depends on individual perspective, personal circumstance, prior experience, technological ability and comfort level with the unknown. So our stance, at my school, will be to see this as an opportunity rather than a challenge. We will approach it, as always, as an inquiry, an extension of our 2020 focus on building cohesion. We will expand our whole school inquiry into building community and a sense of belonging into the new and unfamiliar territory in which we find ourselves.

So these are some of our initial inquiry questions:

  • How might we continue to build cohesion when we are learning from home?
  • How might we create a sense of community despite being physically apart?
  • How might we ensure that everyone feels safe, comfortable and supported?
  • How might we seamlessly (almost) continue the children’s learning, and our own?
  • How might we remotely plan for and provide opportunities for rich learning experiences?
  • How might we ensure the wellbeing of our whole learning community, students, educators and parents?
  • How will every member of our learning community contribute to all the above?
  • And… how might we extend the learning into other communities?

 

 

Self study as an appreciative inquiry…

Over coffee with @shazbailey1, we chat about strategies for making the self study process worthwhile. She shares an approach she took with her teachers and, when I ask if I can steal it, she tells me to adapt and improve on it and then blog about it so that she can steal it back. The biography of an idea 🙂

The enhanced version of the IB Primary Years Program has detailed, well researched articles on all areas of the program, divided into sections: The Learner, Learning and Teaching and The Learning Community. I like the title ‘Principles into Practice’ which fits with our approach to the self study we are currently (perpetually, actually) undertaking. ‘How will we bring the beliefs of the PYP to life?’ rather than ‘How will we ensure we comply with the standards and practices?’

In last night’s session, teachers considered the headings of the sections and talked about which topics they are most familiar with and which they know least about…

Next, they each chose a section to inquire into and spent some time reading the articles and reflecting, individually, in pairs or groups, using a thinking routine adapted from Project Zero.

Connect: What connections can you make to current practice in our school?

Extend: How was your thinking extended? What’s new for you here?

Explore: What might we explore further? (individually and as a school)

The outcome:

  • Productive discussion in mixed groups, across grade levels and specialist areas.
  • Collaborative reflection around big ideas.
  • Collegial sharing and support.
  • A deeper understanding of the principles of the program
  • Documentation of current practice in how we live the PYP.
  • An opportunity to question the way things are.
  • Further ideas for exploration as a school community.
  • Individual goals that teachers will work on.
  • An organic approach to appreciative inquiry.

So simple. So much data for moving forward…

How do we live the PYP?

With the following objectives in mind, we set out to plan a day of thinking, learning and reflecting to launch our PYP self study:

  • Understand the purpose and requirements of the self study – an appreciative inquiry.
  • Ensure clarity of vision for the PYP evaluation – Rather than an exercise in compliance, we will see it as an opportunity to explore how best to bring the standards and practices to life.
  • Connect across teams, grades and campuses to share learning.
  • Ensure familiarity with the standards and practices (the old ones for now – we will map them against the new in a later step).
  • Highlight the major areas of focus in the Enhanced PYP.
  • Begin to reflect on how we bring the standards and practices to life.

A quick Kahoot! quiz in teams provided an opportunity to revisit some of the big ideas in the PYP, introduce some facts and figures about the program globally, mention some of the changes with the enhancements… and add an element of fun.

A provocation: How do we live the PYP?

Teachers considered how we LIVE the PYP at our school. Apart from the obvious, responses included factors such as…

  • Fluid and flexible units
  • Teachers as learners and inquirers
  • Reflection is integral to everything
  • Agency, choice and voice – for students and teachers
  • Curiosity is at the core
  • Time is invested in planning and reflecting
  • We consider the whole child
  • Being open to emergent inquiries
  • A natural language that permeates everything
  • Inquiry as a stance
  • Constant change and growth
  • We inquire into our own practice
  • Individuality is encouraged- in students and teachers
  • We put the learner fist
  • Learning is not prescriptive, innovation is encouraged
  • We walk the talk
  • Open to change and to different perspectives
  • Planning is in response to learning
  • We value process and document our journey.

An inquiry: How might we continue to bring the beliefs of the PYP to life?

In mixed groups we examined standards C1, 2 and 4, using the traffic light protocol (on first instinct, how would we self assess? – Green= going well, orange = on the way, red= not moving yet) and generated questions for both clarification and innovation.

Reflect: How are we currently doing?

Clarify: What do we need to know?

Innovate: What if…? How might we…?

Next we reflected in more depth on Standard C3, the practices that relate to teaching and learning.

Consider: What might this look like in practice?

Share: How are we doing this?

Document: How will we record our evidence?

Taking this practice as an example, ‘Teaching and learning develops student attitudes and skills that allow for meaningful student action in response to students’ own needs and the needs of others,’ we considered the learner action we have witnessed so far this year:

It was then inspiring to witness teachers of 3 year olds sharing learning with teachers of children up to 12, across campuses, languages and specialist areas. The examples were efficiently recorded and photos and videos uploaded to our dedicated Google site. It felt less like gathering evidence of compliance and more like a celebration of the wonderful learning that takes places in our school.

An analysis of the group and individual reflections from the day reveals common threads and patterns that will guide our inquiries moving forward. The next step might be to align the themes that were revealed with the new standards and practices and explore the notion of ‘motifs’ within them…

#PYPEvaluation 2

PYP Evaluation – an appreciative inquiry…

As we begin the self study for our IB PYP evaluation, it’s worth considering how to make it feel less like an inspection (compliance, judgement) and more like an invitation to reflect and an opportunity for growth.

What if we view the process as an appreciative inquiry? 

Define: How best might we LIVE the PYP? 

Rather than proving how we comply with the standards, let’s continue to explore how best to bring them to life.

Discover: What is…?

Reflect on our practice, identify our strengths and celebrate our successes.

Dream: What if..?

Fearlessly and creatively ask ‘what if?‘ and imagine new possibilities.

Design: How might we…?

Identify the best possibilities for innovation, encourage our people to take ownership and bring their ideas to life.

Deliver: How will we…?

Take action. Make things happen 🙂

 

(Thanks @fionannbir and @megangraff)